DURATION 2 Half Days

Course Overview

This course introduces software defined networking (SDN), an emerging paradigm in computer networking that allows a logically centralized software program to control the behavior of an entire network.
Separating a network’s control logic from the underlying physical routers and switches that forward traffic allows network operators to write high-level control programs that specify the behavior of an entire network, in contrast to conventional networks, whereby network operators must codify functionality in terms of low-level device configuration.

This Training is delivered as live on-line training, tacking advantage of the E-Learning Technology:
– Everywhere, every time, from you office/home
– ½ day session: No need to stop your project
– No travel expense & time

Who should attend?

The seminar is built for technical, marketing and business development individuals from Telecom Service Providers as well as Manufacturers of Networking hardware and software products.

Prerequisite:

Delegates must have a fair knowledge of IP, Routing principles and LAN concepts, including basic Ethernet

Course Outline:

Session 1

1. Switching and Routing in a nutshell

2. SDN – Introduction
• SDN history
• Why we need SDN?
• SDN definition

3. Introduction to OpenFlow
• Planes of Networking
• OpenFlow Operation
• H/W & S/W OpenFlow Switches including Open vSwitch
• OpenFlow Evolution
• Current Limitations and Issues

4. OpenFlow controllers and tools
• OpenFlow Controllers
• Software Routing Platform
• OpenFlow Related Tools

Session 2

5. SDN Applications
• Network virtualization
• Data Center traffic management
• WAN traffic management

6. SDN Security
• The main threats to SDN
• The road to a secure SDN

7. Introduction to Virtualization

8. Network Function Virtualization (NFV)
• What is NFV?
• NFV and SDN relationship
• NFV concepts
• NFV architecture

9. NFV Use cases
– Virtualisation of LTE EPC and IMS
• NFV Proof of Concepts
• NFV Summary

10. Vendors and products

11. Final thoughts and conclusions

12. Glossary

13. Summary

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